Why I’m Running

Every organization needs goals. Measurable goals. Goals that specifically define the most important outcomes. 

Goals provide an organization with direction and focus, guide the allocation of resources, tell us if progress is being made, and enable us to hold leaders accountable. 

The Edmonds School District currently has no measurable goals. Over the years, its goals have morphed into a “Strategic Direction,” which generally describes what District leadership should be doing — but in no way defines specific, measurable outcomes with which to hold the District accountable for student growth. 

Nancy leading a discussion with principals in 2011. She worked as a program director in the student learning department of the Edmonds School District for almost 20 years.

Nancy leading a discussion with principals in 2011. She worked as a program director in the student learning department of the Edmonds School District for almost 20 years.

We had a sense of urgency about student learning when I first joined the District in 1999, but that urgency has waned. The decline in the effectiveness of our District’s work is evident by simply looking at a similar district right up the road from us — the Everett School District — which has comparable student demographics to ours. 

Looking at high school graduation rates between our districts as a key indicator of student success, the numbers paint a dismal picture. In the 2001-02 school year, Edmonds had a graduation rate of 78 percent compared to 72 percent in Everett. But today, our graduation rate stands at 88 percent, while Everett has reached a graduation rate of over 95 percent!

What is the difference? A number of years ago Everett set measurable goals for their student graduation rate, focused their resources and District efforts on this goal, and the payoff is clear. It’s time for Edmonds to do the same.

Putting students first

Currently our District is undergoing a community-wide process to develop Blueprint 2025, updating the “Strategic Direction” and guiding our work for years to come. If done properly, this effort could be a critical opportunity toward building an effective accountability system focused on student success and equity. But the goals need to be measurable, define student outcomes, be monitored on a regular basis, and drive decisions made by District leadership. 

In 2015, Nancy received the Outstanding Student Achievement Award from the Washington Association of School Administrators, along with a similar recognition for current School Board President Diana White.

In 2015, Nancy received the Outstanding Student Achievement Award from the Washington Association of School Administrators, along with a similar recognition for current School Board President Diana White.

As a valued educational leader in the Edmonds School District for nearly two decades, I am prepared to understand the School Board’s work on this effort and hit the ground running on Day One. 

I am familiar with tools and strategies deployed across the District, including those used to teach students, assess student learning, build budgets, support teachers, and communicate with parents, students and community members. I know and care about every school in the District. I am familiar with the state, local and federal laws we must follow. And I am committed to being a tireless advocate for all the students we serve to ensure taxpayers’ hard-earned dollars are spent carefully and wisely to achieve student success.

That’s why I am running for the School Board. 

Edmonds is a good district, but I want us to be an outstanding district. We can do it! We have great students, teachers and staff. All we need is innovative and intentional leadership providing focused support to achieve our goals. I believe I have the knowledge, experience and expertise to help guide District leadership toward this vision. I want our District to be run so we can see all our students succeed in everything they choose to do in school and in life.